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[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index=""][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_column_text css=".vc_custom_1550176167999{margin-bottom: 32px !important;}"] by Jacob Klerlein and Sheena Hervey, Generation Ready Rather than basing mathematics learning and teaching on memorized rules for computation, teachers need to be guided by the question: what do proficient mathematicians do as they solve increasingly complex problems? [/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]By the time young children enter school they are already well along the pathway to becoming problem solvers. From birth, children are learning how to learn: they respond to their environment and the reactions of others. This making sense of experience is an ongoing, recursive process. We have known for a long time that reading is a complex problem-solving activity. More recently, teachers have come to understand that becoming mathematically literate is also a complex problem-solving activity that increases in power and flexibility when practiced more often. A problem in mathematics is any situation that must be resolved using mathematical tools but for which there is no immediately obvious strategy. If the way forward is obvious, it’s not a problem—it is a straightforward application.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/3" css=".vc_custom_1550174848958{margin-top: 15px !important;margin-bottom: 15px !important;}"][icon_text box_type="normal" icon="fa-file-pdf-o" icon_type="normal" icon_position="top" icon_size="fa-4x" use_custom_icon_size="no" separator="no" link="/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/Mathematics-as-a-Complex-Problem-Solving-Activity.pdf" link_text="Download a PDF of this White Paper"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern"][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Mathematicians have always understood that problem-solving is central to their discipline because without a problem there is no mathematics. Problem-solving has played a central role in the thinking of educational theorists ever since the publication of Pólya’s book “How to Solve It,” in 1945....

The most powerful way to raise student achievement is through professional learning. More than ever before, students need effective teaching if they are to develop the higher order thinking skills they will need to be career and college ready in the 21st century. At the same time the expectations for student achievement are being raised, the student population in schools is becoming increasingly diverse. This means the need for effective professional development for schools and teachers is critical. ...

The old paradigm of balanced instruction focused on enabling children and teachers to achieve success at school. Today’s paradigm focuses on students achieving college and career readiness in life, beyond school. The old paradigm of balanced instruction focused on enabling children and teachers to succeed at school. Today, the focus is for students to achieve college and career readiness in life beyond school....

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